mouthofthetyne.com September 26 2017




'I thought it was repugnant': Torontonians react to Trump's Charlottesville comments

September 26 2017, 04:02 | Clarence Walton

'I thought it was repugnant': Torontonians react to Trump's Charlottesville comments

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Members of Trump's own Republican party have led the condemnation, with OH governor and former presidential hopeful John Kasich slamming the President's remarks as "pathetic".

Indian-American Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal and some other lawmakers have unveiled a congressional resolution to censure US President Donald Trump for his comments about the violent white nationalist rally in Virginia.

Graham said on Wednesday that Trump's words suggested "moral equivalency" between the two sides and called on the president to use his words to heal Americans. He said he notified the committee he would no longer serve "given the ongoing tone of the discussion". The memo is Dimon's second note to staff regarding Charlottesville.

The White House says it is working to find a "convenient" time for President Donald Trump to speak with the family of the 32-year-old woman who was killed almost a week ago while protesting a white nationalist rally in her Charlottesville, Virginia, hometown. But as comedian Chris Rock tweeted, "If 10 guys think it's OK to hang with 1 Nazi then they just became 11 Nazis".

"By almost two to one, Americans think that President Trump dropped the ball in his handling of this crisis", Miringoff said.

Pence, who is returning home early to Washington tomorrow, said while in Chile "our hearts are on Charlottesville".

"A lot of us joined this administration thinking we could bring to it the experience and expertise that the president didn't have an opportunity to gain in his business career, and to encourage some restraint in what he says publicly and to our allies", a senior official who is contemplating whether to resign told Reuters.

The president's top advisers described themselves as stunned. Indeed, he has gone even further: In a striking admission, Bannon confirmed that he views the racial strife and turmoil unleashed by Charlottesville as a political victor for Trump.

At a heated news conference in New York, Trump said on Tuesday that "there is blame on both sides", and that there were "very fine people" on both sides. The proposed removal of a Lee statue on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville spurred the demonstrations last weekend.

In his resignation from the manufacturing council yesterday, posted on Twitter, AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka said it had failed to help working families.

That's cause for alarm, given the effect that past statements from Trump have had, he added. The other opposes racism and bigotry. They are often at odds with Bannon and the nationalist members of Trump's team.

The steady stream of resignations culminated in a Wednesday morning conference call with members of the Strategy & Policy Forum at which members chose to disband the group, according to a report in the New York Times. "We know that staying silent on these issues is simply not acceptable".



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