mouthofthetyne.com September 21 2017




Charlottesville covers Confederate statues

September 21 2017, 07:45 | Van Peters

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The city covered the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee on Wednesday afternoon along with the statue of Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson at another nearby park. They want to make sure that Confederate leaders - men who fought to preserve slavery, men who picked a fight that lead to 600,000 deaths, men who were unapologetically racist - remain revered. Three in four of them were built before 1950, but at least one in 10 of them were dedicated during the civil rights movement or since the year 2000.

Two cities in Florida - Jacksonville and Gainesville - began moving on initiatives to remove controversial Confederate statues. Hundreds of years from now, pictures of their toppling will be included in histories of the U.S. Civil War-and of how the battle to defeat the slave power once and for all was waged well into the 21st century. Trump may know the statue debate is a safer place for him to be than the maelstrom over whether both sides were to blame in Charlottesville. Additionally, it's an effort to remove statues or symbols that glorify the Confederacy or white supremacy. Fenves now says statues of Lee, Confederate Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston and Confederate Postmaster General John H. Reagan, which were in the same area as Davis, also will be moved to the Brisco Center for American History on campus.

If, though, it's an incidental part of a larger work like the flag in Capitol mural, or it's clearly not meant to honor the Confederacy or its leaders, that's a different matter worth deeper discussion.

Illinois College history professor Alonzo Ward said it is a complex issue, and he offered some background into why the monuments were put up in the first place. "Erected during the period of Jim Crow laws and segregation, the statues represent the subjugation of African Americans".

"CONFEDERATE STATUES don't belong in public".

One of the reasons these conflicts happen is because Internet users often do not realize that they are talking - or arguing - with a real person.

"Hogg was alive during the Civil War, but was too young to serve".

The recent events in Charlottesville have prompted discussions across the country regarding building names and monuments honoring Confederate leaders and soldiers.

Though Mishka called slavery a "birth defect" of our nation, he deferred to the oft-cited argument that removing these statues is akin to erasing history.

"Many advocates of the monuments are mistakenly equating Confederate figures with the Founding Fathers". "I wonder, is it George Washington next week", he told reporters during an rumbustious press conference in Trump Tower. However, the Founding Fathers were clearly instrumental in ripping this country from the throes of British tyranny.

For right now the statues remain with the city council planning to shroud the statues with fabric as a symbol of the city's mourning.

Now we are engaged in a great post-Civil War debate over Confederate monuments and other honors to a secessionist movement, even here in NY.



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